thagoodthings:

neeneelicious:

yarrahs-life:

Are Child Support Laws Unfair to Fathers?

Crying because he brings home $1626 weekly and 350 of that goes to his kid. Guess how many single mothers live on 1276 or less a week without support. Manage your money better and you wont have to live with your parents. Take care of your children and stop fucking complaining.

Atleast in the few situations I have seen personally they are not.

Daycare is at the same cost as monthly rent these days…on top if daycare cost, healthcare, housing, food,clothes diapers etc etc child support really does not cover much BUT daycare. I mean for other single women child support isn’t enough along with food stamps especially with cost of living is still rising…now I do not think that me should go to jail for not paying child support I think that just causes more issues.

I mean each case if different, each state is different with rules. Some cases can be unfair but ppl end to realize that child support and child custody are two different courts with two different processes. You can spend half the year with your child and still pay a mass amount of child support. Child support is based in equaling the income both parents households (atleast in North Carolina it is). So that the child gets the same support form each parent

Some people could do yoga for a month with ONE of his weekly pay checks.

thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
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This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info
thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video
Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.


They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NCI have to send this to my sister
Zoom Info

thagoodthings:

yellowgrowngreen:

ataoldotcom:

detodossantos:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

This. This is how you break down ableist barriers. This is incredible for the deaf and for the custies. I would love to learn sign language, and I would learn it faster if it was standing between me and booze

this is so important

Hopefully this becomes an international thing.

They need this in DC right near Gallaudet & in NC
I have to send this to my sister

odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info
odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims
1. Criminalizing Blackness in America
2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares”
3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death
4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)
This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe
Zoom Info

odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims

1Criminalizing Blackness in America

2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares

3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death

4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)

This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe

The Overwhelming Nature Of Code-Switching

han-nara:

By EDITOR Originally published on Rhode Island NPR Mon June 3, 2013

Code-switching can be far from empowering. When I was 2 1/2, I was adopted from Korea. I went from one culture to another, one language to another. For me, code-switching wasn’t a freedom, or a choice. It was a one-way street.

I wasn’t aware that I was code-switching, of course. I only knew that I was different and that I didn’t want to be. There were times, when people stared at me and my white parents, that I felt as if I had been caught in a lie. I hated those stares not because they reminded me of my difference but because they reminded me that no matter what, that difference would always be there. People had their own opinions of who I was.

Often we code-switch in an effort to fit expectations, whether consciously or unconsciously — an athlete speaking differently on-court than in a press conference, or a job applicant trying to sound more professional for an interview — but what about when those efforts aren’t believed, or accepted?

When I returned to Korea as an adult, I was surprised to find that many Westerners’ attempts to speak Korean drew compliments while gyopos’ (foreigners who are ethnically Korean) often drew lectures.A white dude who attended my traditional Korean marriage in a hanbok was seen positively, as making an effort, or at least neutrally. In America, though, my fully cultural whiteness never seemed positive except as a reflection on my parents. I was “lucky” they had adopted me.

In Korea, I was teaching English at a language academy where almost all of the teachers were white North Americans. There were times when I wanted to speak English and behave within the social mores I grew up with. In order to hang out, though, I often had to code-switch in a way that made me feel ashamed, that again made me realize my permanent difference. At this point, I was far more aware of what I was doing. I knew I was switching.

I would be out with a group of teachers, and someone would complain about Korean men, Korean schools, the Korean government, and then others would chime in — and I would find myself speaking out against Korea, too. Not out of any real opinion, either agreement or disagreement, but because they seemed to like me more. “It must be hard for you here,” they would say. “Koreans are so racist. They probably don’t accept you. But of course you’re an American.” And so on. They included me by my exclusion from Korea. I felt then as if I were catching myself in a lie.

So why did I continue to code-switch with these teachers? The question is a tough one. If we code-switch to get jobs, to make friends, at what point are we indicating that we will mold to expectations no matter how they clash with our realities? Why do we try so hard to fit in when doing so might make it harder for us to be seen as we are? That is, when our trying to fit in makes it so that people expect us to try to fit in and yet also makes it so that we never can.

I met my wife in Korea. At first, she was like a guide to the me I had lost. Sometimes I wonder what our marriage looks like to outsiders: an attempt to reclaim my heritage, or a rejection of my earlier code switch? My wife and I live in a constant state of in-between, mixing Korean with English, eating Korean and American food, watching k-dramas with subtitles for me. But this in-between feels comfortable, maybe because I never feel obliged, or disbelieved. It is the freedom to put forward whatever part of you, and be seen as the same.

Now that we have a baby, we try hard to teach her Korean culture and language. We do want her to be able to fit in, yet it’s not really about that. It’s more about giving her control. It’s about being already, in her heart, confident in who she is, however people may judge her. We want her always to feel true to herself.

Matthew Salesses (@salesses) has written about adoption, race and family for the New York Times Motherlode blog, The Good Men Project, The Rumpus, Hyphen Magazine, and elsewhere. His most recent book is a novel, I’m Not Saying, I’m Just Saying.